When people, technology and place are holistically incorporated in design, the result can be more engaging, connected care — care that not only supports satisfying interactions and connections, but actually inspires them.


EXAM SPACES

For most people, the exam room is at the center of the healthcare experience. No longer just a place for medical exams and treatments, it’s also a space where consulting, learning and person-to-person sharing happen.

Key Insights:

  • Learning is an essential part of effective healthcare.
  • Family or other support persons are often in the exam room as important partners in the patient’s health.
  • There’s new pressure on clinicians to make every moment count.
  • Technology is opening new opportunities in healthcare, and it should be fully incorporated in exam rooms.

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WORKSPACES FOR CLINICIANS

As the healthcare industry undergoes rapid change, clinican’s work is becoming even more demanding and varied. There are new technologies and methods of record keeping. New administrative tasks, staff shortages, sicker patients, more private rooms, more expectations and more pressure.

Key Insights:

  • Clinicians alternate between collaboration and focused individual work throughout their work shift.
  • People are different sizes and have varied preferences for how they work.
  • Technology advances are rapidly changing work processes.
  • Successful healthcare is interdependent, connected care.

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PATIENT ROOMS

More than ever, patient rooms are more than just a place for a bed and medical equipment. They are intimate environments where patients, families and clinicians come together around care. At their best, they are environments that aid a patient’s recovery, improve how clinicians do their jobs and welcome family members as active participants in care.

Key Insights:

  • Without space to spare, multifunctionality is essential in patient rooms.
  • Bedside teaching and learning is an essential part of high-value, patient-centered care.
  • Successful healthcare includes family or other support persons as information sources, patient advocates and care partners.
  • Hospitalization increases feelings of vulnerability, intensifying needs for choices and personal comfort in the space.

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ONCOLOGY TREATMENT SPACES

Instead of a “one room fits all” approach, oncology treatment centers are designed as an ecosystem of spaces to serve a wide range of people with different needs and preferences. High customer satisfaction differentiation are rewards for organizations that focus on personalizing the treatment experience by offering choice and control to participants, helping to humanize this demanding segment of the healthcare journey.

Key Insights:

  • For cancer patients, emotional comfort is as important as physical comfort, and needs and preferences vary.
  • Family members provide vital support to patients, and their needs should not be overlooked.
  • Technology improves the treatment experience.
  • An environment of hospitality improves the care experience.

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WAITING SPACES

When designed around people’s needs, waiting spaces can help create a better experience by fostering more meaningful uses of time and increasing patient’s confidence that they are receiving high-value care.

Key Insights:

  • Technology empowers meaningful waiting.
  • People naturally seek separation from strangers and proximity with family while waiting.
  • Active, productive waiting calls for a variety of environments.
  • Physical and emotional comfort is important when people are waiting.
  • Waiting is an ideal opportunity to educate people about good health.

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